Welcome! I am Rabbi Jonathan Biatch of Madison, Wisconsin. "Pulpit Perspectives: My Observations as a Congregational Rabbi" is published every two weeks to reflect my observations about life in my congregation and with my members. The opinions expressed here are solely my own. I invite you to join the dialogue!

Thursday, April 24, 2014

The Essence of Judaism – What Would You Say?

Over the last few weeks, I have had what is an annual parade of students of world religion classes from local colleges visit my office and interview me about Judaism.  This year, the question they all asked was, “What are the most important beliefs of Judaism?”

I hope you offered your replies on our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/templebethelmadison.  So here is my answer to these students:

There are three Jewish beliefs that are the most important, and that distinguish Judaism from other faiths and religious communities.

I.   First, the history of our belief in the One God, Creator of the heavens and the earth, who is a benevolent and non-punishing God.  Honoring one god allows us to have focus and to develop a personal relationship with that God.  Other religions, past and present, might have been perceived to have one or multiple gods, who must be appeased because of their jealousy and need for fealty, and who punishes for infractions, major and minor.  And it is true that the God of Israel comes across this way in the Torah.  But when the Talmudic sages of our people spoke about and tried to analyze the characteristics of our God, they described the Holy One of Blessing in compassionate and human terms.  This God has chastised Israel in the past, but now is with and supports the people of Israel in all their endeavors.

II.      Second, the belief that each person is created in the image of God, and that each person is equal in God’s eyes regardless of their gender, sexual orientation, nationality, religion, or any other characteristic that has tragically divided people from one another.  As a corollary, the book of Genesis uses the imagery of the “image of God” to denote also that each person carries with them elements of the Divine.  Therefore, each person is deserving of respect and love.

III.    And third, that each person receives at birth a soul that is pure and good, and that each person has the capacity to rise to great heights of human achievement during his and her lifetime.  This characteristic, too, underscores the essence of human dignity, because each person, regardless of traits that may distinguish one from another, is truly equal to one another!

Please leave comments - I would be interested in your observations and dialogue on this question!

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